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Posts Tagged ‘painting’

Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Let’s face it. Some people are just born to be unbalanced, uncoordinated, and generally klutzy. They may stumble through life, wreaking havoc wherever they go. But some people truly take the cake.

Here’s the story…

Imagine you are in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. You are admiring one of Picasso’s great masterpieces, a famous painting called “The Actor.” An art class comes along to study the painting, and then WHAM — one of the students loses her balance and falls into the painting, ripping a six-inch hole in the bottom of the canvas.

That is precisely what happened last Friday.

The woman, who has not been named, seems to have just lost her balance, but the Metropolitan Museum of Art would not give reporters any indication as to why.

According to an article in the Associated Press, “The Met said the damage did not impact the ‘focal point of the composition’ and that it should be repaired in the coming weeks ahead of a major Picasso retrospective featuring some 250 works at the museum opening on April 27.”

Talk about embarrassing. I don’t think I would ever be able to live that one down if that were me. I wonder if the museum is making her pay for it…

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Upon stumbling around the internet the other day, I came across a news story on a Chinese painter with some absolutely wonderful and fun art. His name is Liu Bolin, he is thirty five years old, and every picture he paints is a self portrait. How’s it done? He simply paints himself invisible….into each photograph, of course. 

Completion of one painting may take up to ten hours. Many of his pieces are not done on canvas, but instead he paints on himself. He then strategically places himself around certain parts of his city and has a photographer shoot photos of him. People that pass by his artwork usually don’t even realize he is in the scenery until he moves an arm or a leg.

According to Oddity Central, Bolin’s art is a form of protest to the Chinese government, which has caused him to feel a loss of personal identiy and also shut down his art studio back in 2005. One of his main goals, it seems, is to be strange — he doesn’t want to fit into modern society. Who can blame him? (PS. By clicking on the oddity central link, you can view a few more of his paintings.)

Watch the video of his work from ABC News….

or do a google image search for more of his art.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

A smallish chalk, ink, and pen drawing has been quite the topic of conversation in the art world lately. Back in January, the painting was sold at an art auction at Christie’s in New York. It was titled “a Young Girl in Profile in Renaissance Dress.” It’s value was labeled at anywhere between $12,000 and $16,000.
The newly discovered painting. Photo from dwworld.com.

The newly discovered painting. Photo from dwworld.com.

But then the dealer who purchased the painting, Kate Ganz, suggested that perhaps it was based off of a Leonardo Da Vinci type of design. Since then, the painting’s value has been upped to $160 million.

According to dw world.com, art sleuths then had to determine it’s authenticity. “The painting was photographed using a multi-spectral camera developed by the Lumiere Technology company in Paris.

Then Peter Paul Biro, a Montreal-based forensic art expert, examined the images of the drawing and identified a fingerprint near the top left of the art work which matched that of the index or middle-finger of Leonardo da Vinci. The Lumiere process enables the pigments mixtures and pigments of each pixel to be identified without having to damage the drawing by taking a physical sample.

Professor Kemp originally code-named the painting La Bella Milanese, and then later re-named it to La Bella Principessa after he identified her, by what he called a process of elimination, as Bianca Sforza, the daughter of Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan and his mistress Bernardina de Corradis.

The vellum of the painting was also subjected to a Carbon-14 analysis at the Institute for Particle Physics in Zurich which gave the painting a date in the range of 1452 to 1508.”

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