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Posts Tagged ‘concert’

Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

After perusing around the internet for quite a bit, I happened to stumble across some very interesting tour rumors for Phish this summer. Fans have been eagerly awaiting some sort of announcement from the band.

Because of the successful 2009 tour, the band decided that it would play a 2010 tour as well, but have not yet released any information as to when and where those shows will take place.

Most likely, summer tour dates will not be released until later this season. After all, it is only February. We still have a ways to go. In the meantime, the rumors keep circulating.

Direct from the MN Live Music Blog, here are some possible tour dates:

> > > June 11 Deer Creek Noblesville IN
> > > June 12 Deer Creek Noblesville IN
> > > June 13 Deer Creek Noblesville IN
> > > June 16 Huntington Park Columbus OH
> > > June 18 Verizon Wireless Charlotte NC
> > > June 19 Virginia Beach Amphitheatre Va Beach
> > > June 21 HersheyPark Stadium Harrisburg PA
> > > June 23 Merriweather Post Columbia
> > > June 25 Aarons Amphitheatre Atlanta GA
> > > June 26 Aarons Amphitheatre Atlanta GA
> > > June 27 Aarons Amphitheatre Atlanta GA
> > > July 12 Jones Beach Wantagh NY
> > > July 15 Citi Field Flushing
> > > July 16 PNC Bank Arts Center Holmdel
> > > July 17 PNC Bank Arts Center Holmdel
> > > July 18 Susquehanna Center Camden NJ
> > > July 19 Susquehanna Center Camden NJ
> > > July 21 Molson Amphitheatre Toronto
> > > July 31 TBA Denver
> > > Aug 5 The Gorge George
> > > Aug 6 The Gorge George
> > > Aug 7 The Gorge George
> > > Aug 9 MGM Grand Las Vegas
> > > Aug 10 MGM Grand Las Vegas
> > > Aug 12 Verizon Wireless Irvine

Keep in mind, once again, that nothing has been confirmed thus far. These are simply rumors.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Today the schedule of upcoming events from Jazz at Lincoln Center was announced, sparking much excitement from fans of the jazz entertainment world.

This season, the series will not only feature great jazz performances, but will also offer educational opportunities and broadcasts as well. The most famous of the educational opportunities is most likely WeBop, a session where parents and children can gather and experience different jazz instruments and artists. The interesting aspect of this entertainment is that guests are invited to take part in the action!

The 2010-2011 season will focus on different types of jazz from all around the world, including traditional New Orleans jazz and Afro beat jazz. Main headliners of the season are well known artists Chick Corea and Chucho Valdes.

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis.

The Jazz at Lincoln Center press release highlights some of the events from the series:

  • Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis concerts include band’s first-ever collaborations with Chick Corea and Ute Lemper.
  • New Visionary Voices series in Rose Theater features Bobby McFerrin, Dianne Reeves and Sweet Honey In The Rock.
  • New Jazz & Popular Song series, curated by Michael Feinstein, director, in The Allen Room.
  • Double bills featuring Terence Blanchard and Branford Marsalis; and Ahmad Jamal and Lee Konitz.
  • Concerts feature the music of Sarah Vaughan, The Modern Jazz Quartet, Charlie Parker, Bud Powell and Earl Hines and Wynton Marsalis.

These are just a select few of the concerts being held this season. For more information on the series or to order tickets, please visit the Jazz at Lincoln Center website.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove 

Last Saturday night, I strolled on down to the Sherman Theater in Stroudsburg to see one of my favorite bluegrass jam bands play. Railroad Earth, of Stillwater, New Jersey, has been playing and perfecting their sound for years around the area, as well as across the country.
 

All the boys of Railroad Earth minus Mike Carbone. Photo by Kate Langenburg.

The band opened with a stellar, upbeat “Drag Him Down” but then backed off the high uppity bass and focused on some slower songs, particularly “For Love.” I can appreciate the vibe they were trying to set, but it kind of ruined the mood a little. People were psyched up to see the show. RRE started with an upbeat song, then played slow songs for almost the entire rest of set one. It was definitely a tease.However, at the end of set one, the band went into a bumpin’ version of “Head” which always gets a crowd going. As Todd Schaeffers vocals screeched out, the audience sang back to him and threw up their hands each time he repeated the call. Thank the bluegrass gods for making them play this song. I think it was the highlight of the concert.

 

 After intermission, they came back with more chill vibes. Not to say I was disappointed by this, but I was just ready to dance, that’s all. It’s kind of hard to dance to music without a strong, up beat. Here’s the complete set list:
 
 Set 1: Drag Him Down>For Love>Seven Story Mountain>Old Man and the Land>The Hunting Song>Shockenawe Mountain Breakdown>Head
 
Set 2: Where Songs Begin>Walk Beside Me>Luxury Liner>Jerusalem Ridge>RV>Warhead Boogie>New Jam (SHJ)>Moonshiner
 
Encore: Genesis>Bringin’ My Baby Back Home
 
The lights were awesome — Every time I go to the Sherman Theater, their light shows get more and more advanced. Different hues of reds, blues, and yellows washed over the audience as they bopped up and down to the music. At times, the lights seemed to take on a mind of their own, zipping back and forth from the stage to the audience.
 
The only other thing I will have to mention is something I usually have no complaints about at the Sherman: the sound. While most of the instruments sounded in tune and jacked up to the right volume, I felt that the bass was way too overblown. Walking up to the side of the stage, the speakers literally produced wind everytime the bass was plucked. The result was a muddled effect, of which I was unhappy with.
 
This was the second show in a row that Railroad Earth played at the Sherman Theater. They usually play two nights every year around Thanksgiving. Not that I didn’t like the show, but I think next time they should focus on their boppin’ bluegrass beats a little more. I will leave you with some good clips I got:
 
 
 
And if you’re feeling frisky, you can read about the time I interviewed Railroad Earth’s lead singer Todd Schaeffer. Click here.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

It’s finally happened to me after all these years. That’s right, I finally went to my very first Phish show ever! Let’s just say this — I went on Tuesday night. It is now Friday and I can’t stop daydreaming about it, listening to my live Phish albums, and wanting to go back for more. This band has had a lot of time to perfect their shows…and they certainly have.

After releasing their first album in 1986 and touring for nearly twenty years, the band went on a haitus, a break that was much needed for certain members who had started overdoing the drugs (I won’t mention names here.) Nonetheless, that time gave them all a time out and a chance to think about what they wanted for the future of their music. Now they’re back, armed with a slick light show and some seriously funky beats.

Photo by Kate Langenburg

The crowd in the Wachovia Center Tuesday night was ridiulously large. I never knew venues of that size existed until now. (I also never would have guessed I would end up with a club box seat complete with my own private bar, bathroom, and sitting area.) Everyone in the entire place seemed to be grooving simultaneously, with smiles and good vibes permeating the walls of the arena.

Here’s the setlist from the November 24 Philadelphia show:  

Set 1: Chalk Dust Torture>Bathtub Gin>Cities>Camel Walk>The Curtain With>The Wedge>The Moma Dance>Reba>Golgi Apparatus>Stealing Time From the Faulty Plan

Set 2: Possum>Down With Disease>Twenty Years Later>Harry Hood>The Mango Song>Mike’s Song>Simple>Slave to the Traffic Light>Weekapaug Groove

Encore: A Day in the Life

From the very first note of Chalkdust, I knew I was in for something great. When they went into a real funky Moma Dance, I was in heaven. Everyone was singing along with Reba one minute then, jamming out to Possum, then going into a free fall whirlwind of musical pleasure when they heard A Day in the Life.

Phish’s sound has certainly gotten stronger over the years, and I don’t see this band disappearing any time soon. They are loved by too many fans, have too much talent, and have the drive to keep on keepin’ on. I don’t even know which song was my favorite…they were all wonderful, amazing, beautiful, great. Check out my videos from the show by clicking on the song names below:

The Moma Dance

Simple

Weekapaug Groove

A Day in the Life (Encore)

If anyone I work with happens to read this post, I’m sorry, but I just might have to quit my job and go on tour with Phish. 🙂

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Well, gee. I didn’t know Willie Nelson had his own Sirius satellite radio station. The old timer’s radio spot is called Willie’s Place and you can find all of his favorite music, including his own.

Help Willie Nelson in his campaign to save farms. Photo from 1019rxp.com.

Help Willie Nelson in his campaign to save farms. Photo from 1019rxp.com.

Tomorrow, Willie will be playing all of Farm Aid 2009 in its entirety on the station. The event will kick off at 2 pm, so make sure you’re near your satellite radio (or your friend’s or family member’s). Some of the featured performances will be from Willie himself, along with Neil Young, John Mellencamp, Dave Matthews, and Wilco.

So what is Farm Aid, you may ask. The concert is put on every year to promote awareness for farming communities and local farms. Too many farmers are forced to sell their land or cannot farm during hard times, especially like the hard times we have experienced this year. 

This will be the twenty-fourth concert since the idea was first brought to light in 1985. The concert was originally started by Willie, Neil Young, and John Mellencamp.

Willie Nelson also has his own thoughts on Farm Aid. Give his Farm Aid letter a read.

The Farm Aid website (linked above as “Farm Aid 2009”) also has information on how you can donate, if you’re so inclined to do so. What these musicians are doing is a great thing to help give back to a community that needs help. Without farms, where would we get our delicious fruits and veggies, milk and cheese, hamburgers and hot dogs? (OK, I’m going a little overboard, but you get the point.)

Tune in to Willie’s Place tomorrow at 2pm for a great bunch of performances. It’s all for a good cause!

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Well, first thing’s first….I’m back! After a long month away from a computer, I have finally re-emerged from the darkness and have seen the light of the wonderful internet. (Funny how we rely so much on technology to live our lives, huh?)

Anyway, I will get right into the next post. This past weekend, I had the pleasure of attending the Delaware Water Gap’s 32nd annual COTA Festival, or Jazzfest, as known by the locals. Each year, surrounding local musicians get together and put on a three day festival in the heart of the Poconos, right next to the beautiful Delaware River.

The great thing about this festival is that there is so much talent in it. The local jazz musicians in the Poconos are not just any musicians — many of them are known worldwide for their great musicianship and virtuosity. Take, for example, Phil Woods, famous saxophonist who has played with many known musicians. He is also the co-founder of the COTA Festival.

Or what about Bob Dorough? You may not know his name, but you’ll know his music…conjuction, junction, what’s your function? That’s right. He wrote all the music for Schoolhouse Rock. And what a great performer he is!

Dave Leibman hits a high note at the COTA Festival. Photo by Kate Langenburg.

Dave Leibman hits a high note at the COTA Festival. Photo by Kate Langenburg.

And I also want to mention Dave Leibman, a very talented, often obscure jazz saxophonist who played with many performers throughout the festival.

Perhaps two of the most interesting performances came from a local drummer named Bill Goodwin and a well-known singer named Nellie McKay. Bill Goodwin and his group performed several interesting Thelonius Monk songs, while Nellie McKay danced and dazzled her audience with her cute singing and daydreamy lyrics.

While all that music was happening, local artists gathered their best works and put them on display in tents just outside the stage area. There were photos from previous years at the festival, beautiful pieces of handmade jewelry, and even lamps made out of antique instruments. If you got tired of sitting on the hillside, you could just wander down the street to the artisans and check out their goodies.

And the food — oh! The falafel sandwiches, ice cream, and black beans with chicken and rice. Mmmm.

All in all, this year’s festival was a musical success. It may be slowly losing money, but jazz lovers in the Pocono Mountains will never let this festival die. Thanks to all the contributors throughout all three days!

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

I believe I’ve already posted three separate blog pieces about Woodstock, but hey, can you blame me? The fest was awesome and we’re celebrating its 40th birthday this weekend.

Probably one of the most famous posters of all time. Photo from solarnavigator.net.

Probably one of the most famous posters of all time. Photo from solarnavigator.net.

In yet another attempt to pay tribute to the great all-mighty 1969 Woodstockers, Sirius satellite radio has begun an epic task — playing just about every show from the entire three day concert.

One of the classic rock channels, called Deep Tracks, has been taken over by Woodstock performers this weekend! (They even renamed it the Woodstock Channel just for this special programming event.) The celebration of music and arts started on Friday and will end today (Sunday).

Not only will the Woodstock Channel be playing music, but it will also be showcasing interviews with performers about their experiences playing on Yasgur’s Farm, and will also be discussing the new movie about the festival, Taking Woodstock.

Just sitting here this morning watching the Woodstock movie has brought fond feelings to this weekend. That is my own tribute. It was truly a time of happiness and carefree lives. Hopefully the folks attending this weekend’s 40th reunion concert will be able to recreate some of those good natured feelings. I’m sure they will.

Which reminds me, if any of you original Woodstockers have any memories or experiences you’d like to share from the 1969 concert, please share them with me! I’d love to hear about them.

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