Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘college reading’

Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Perks of Being a Wallflower was banned for homosexuality. Photo from amazon.com.

Perks of Being a Wallflower was banned for homosexuality. Photo from amazon.com.

There’s nothing better than getting completely, lose-yourself  immersed in a good book. Avid readers alike will agree. Add a little controversy to that and you’ve got yourself a Banned Book Week.

Yesterday, September 26, marked the first day of the voracious reader’s favorite week. It is a celebration of our freedom of speech and our freedom to read what we want.

According to the American Library Association (ALA), “the books featured during Banned Book Week have been targets of attempted bannings.  Fortunately, while some books were banned or restricted, in a majority of cases the books were not banned, all thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, booksellers, and members of the community to retain the books in the library collections.”

As far as Banned Book Week 2009 is concerned, here is a select list of controversial books that were chosen:

  • And Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell.   
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman
  • American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis  
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling
  • The Koran

These are just a few titles. If you wanted to do a comprehensive search on the internet of all books that have ever been banned or attempted to ban, you’d find thousands.

Banned Book Week finishes up on October 3rd. Make sure you get out there and grab yourself one of those forbidden books before then!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

For those of you who know me, you know that I’m a general book buyer for a small, independently run University bookstore. To lead into my next post, I would like to prelude with the following information: Last week, I bought three copies of I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell by Tucker Max and the first day I put them out on the shelf, they all sold within five hours.

Of course, we’re selling to a college audience here, so naturally I was pretty sure they would sell…but that fast?

This is the man to hold responsible. Photo from ihopetheyservebeerinhell.com.

This is the man to hold responsible. Photo from ihopetheyservebeerinhell.com.

Last night, the movie version of the book was released in theaters. Judging from the trailer, it looks to be a real winner (note: sarcasm detected), and not to mention a dumbed down version of The Hangover. From those who have read the book and have seen the movie, the review seems to be, “the movie did not give the book justice.” But isn’t that how it usually goes with books-turned-movies?

Regardless, it’s interesting that one of the main selling points of this movie is that it is offensive. The film’s website even includes I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell facts. As of right now, it says: “Fact #3: Fat girls are not real people” then gives web surfers the option to tweet that message on Twitter. As much as it’s really f-ed up, offensive things usually sell. Just look at the success of Borat. Any publicity is good publicity.

Along the same vein, it seems that the movie creators are also really enthused that critics have called the film “a worthless piece of crap.” They are quite proud of the fact that their movie has sparked controversy after only having been released a day now.

If you want to check out that website, it could be fun. Go ahead and feed your curiosity. I think I’ll put this movie in the good ‘ol Netflix queue and wait for it to come to disc.

Read Full Post »