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Posts Tagged ‘Arts’

Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

The Addams Family, a tv show that goes way back in cable viewing history, has taken on many forms. Of course, it started as a black and white sitcom of sorts, then was transformed into a movie and a sequel (were there more than two?). But now, it has taken on a whole new face…a musical production on Broadway.

One would think that there would be much for theater artists to create, what with the morbidity and dark humor that oozes from the characters. I would picture a dark set with dark props…overall, very dark. Indeed. But what about the characters?

Critics who have seen it were let down by the new Broadway show.

‘”You’ll laugh a lot, though never during the unmemorable songs, which are supposed to be funny but aren’t,” said The Wall Street Journal. “You’re more than likely to spend a considerable part of the evening wondering how much the set cost.”‘

Ouch. That has to hurt for actors Nathan Lane and Bebe Neuwirth, who play Gomez and Morticia Addams, respectively.

According to ABC News, ‘The New York Times said: “Being in this genuinely ghastly musical … must feel like going to a Halloween party in a strait-jacket or a suit of armor.”‘

Geez, it must be pretty bad to spark such hatred. If you still have the urge to see this musical, be my guest. But make sure you tell us about it. I hear Nathan Lane was the lesser of all evils throughout the entire play. Check out the Addams Family Musical Website for more.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Over the years, we have seen some amazing, groundbreaking musical performances. Some will go down in history. Others will hold a special place in our hearts.

Throughout quite a few of those performances, rock ‘n roll photographer Jim Marshall was there, taking pictures of some of the most famous faces in music entertainment. With his recent death at 74 years old, we remember his life and his images.

Marshall, who died in his sleep on Tuesday night, focused on the unique personalities of the human beings in his photos. His black and white images cut to the core of some of the well-known musicians from the 60s and 70s. Some of the photos were taken during musical performances, while others focused on musicians offstage.

According to the New York Times, his most famous pictures were of Jimi Hendrix setting his guitar on fire. He captured a raw energy coming from Jimi as he doused the instrument in gasoline. Others include the famous image of Johnny Cash giving the middle finger and Janis Joplin backstage with a bottle of Southern Comfort.

View a slide show of his photographs here.

Because of his reputation he was able to get access to many of the most prestigious shows. In some cases, he was the only photographer allowed in certain venues.

That being said, we thank him for his historical journey into the lives of famous musicians. We now have great rock ‘n roll images that we will never forget.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Actor Paul Reubens, better known as Pee Wee Herman from Pee Wee’s Playhouse among other Pee Wee movies, has returned to the spot light once again.

It has taken Reubens around twenty years to get himself back to a semi popular role in entertainment. After exposing himself in an adult movie theater in 1991, Americans lost almost all their respect for the goofy kid show star.

Between then and now, he has wandered from movie to movie, taking small roles here and there. Reubens has appeared in movies like Blow, Mystery Men, and even Roald Dahl’s book-gone-movie Matilda.

His old show, Pee Wee’s Playhouse, will now be turned into a newer, more updated stage show. The new show is a recapturing of Pee Wee’s original performances with the Los Angeles comedy troupe, The Groundlings. It will run up until February 7, 2010 at Club Nokia.

According to the Associated Press, Reubens is very happy with his comeback. “It’s been interesting coming back into the spotlight … but it’s been feeling very exciting. I’m totally excited. I don’t even know what to say, heh heh heh,” he said.

Here’s a video of Reubens’ thoughts about his comeback. Enjoy the craziness…

I know many people and critics alike still think he’s funny, and I’d have to agree, but let’s see if he can keep it in his pants this time around.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

This little piggie went to Pennywell Farm. This little piggie snubbed his nose in paint. This little piggie cried “I want to be like Jackson Pollock” all the way home. Cheesy, I know, but how can I resist when the subject of today’s post happens to be pig artists?

You may be familiar with Pennywell Farm. It sits on the hillside of Devon in England and is most known for its cute baby animals, especially miniature pigs. (We might call them piglets.) Lately, its owners have decided to steer from the boring old petting zoo routine and aim more for artistic talents…with their pigs, of course.

The little piglets are creating works of art that have been selling for close to $30 each. All of the profits from their oinktastic talents are going towards the Farm Crisis Network Charity. So far they have raised around $250.

Pennywell Farm’s owner, Chris Murray, told the Daily Mail that his piglets accidentally broke out of their enclosure during a craft fair one day and went straight for the paints that had been laying around, digging their snouts in the tins. (Luckily, the paint was non-toxic.) Ever since, he has seen them as little Jackson Pollocks.

Here is an example of their fine handiwork:

Now can you understand why he calls them Jackson Pollocks?

Murray said, “The pigs tended to go more for pointilism – they weren’t too keen on cubism. We think of them as our little Pigassos.” Not only are the canvases covered in paint when the pigs are done with their work, but so are they!

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Upon stumbling around the internet the other day, I came across a news story on a Chinese painter with some absolutely wonderful and fun art. His name is Liu Bolin, he is thirty five years old, and every picture he paints is a self portrait. How’s it done? He simply paints himself invisible….into each photograph, of course. 

Completion of one painting may take up to ten hours. Many of his pieces are not done on canvas, but instead he paints on himself. He then strategically places himself around certain parts of his city and has a photographer shoot photos of him. People that pass by his artwork usually don’t even realize he is in the scenery until he moves an arm or a leg.

According to Oddity Central, Bolin’s art is a form of protest to the Chinese government, which has caused him to feel a loss of personal identiy and also shut down his art studio back in 2005. One of his main goals, it seems, is to be strange — he doesn’t want to fit into modern society. Who can blame him? (PS. By clicking on the oddity central link, you can view a few more of his paintings.)

Watch the video of his work from ABC News….

or do a google image search for more of his art.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

You know, even though I’m not an avid Oprah Winfrey Show lover, I have to say that it’s a real shame the show is ending in a few months. The star announced her departure from her afternoon television slot on November 19. I mean, it’s something that I watched on and off here and there (mostly with female family members), but also something that I’m sure many people see as a staple of American television.

See ya!

It seems like whatever Oprah has said over all these years, certainly goes. She has, in a certain way, led a great part of American culture. Think about all the books you’ve ever read with an Oprah book club seal of approval on the front cover. Whoever she endorses is sure to be a celebrity. She’s shown us that she’s up with the times and has had a sympathetic voice for those in need. People like her.

The sad thing is thinking about all those people who will miss having her in their living rooms on weekday afternoons. I’m thinking mostly about all those old ladies who have had her show as a staple of each and every day…or about working moms who just get home from work, kick off their shoes, and see what Oprah has to say about life. Just a few examples.

However, I’m sure that even though the show is disappearing, Oprah won’t. She is a strong voice in this country, and will still make that voice known. What will she do next?

 

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

As promised, today I will be giving you a review of the Bethel Woods Harvest Festival and Mountain Jam. Now, if only it had been nicer weather! The entire day, it misted rain, which made things a little harder to navigate, but still great. Luckily, everything was under tents.

Well let me start by saying that Bethel Woods is such a beautiful place to go. Even if you’re not going to the Woodstock museum, you can walk the site of the original Woodstock. It’s expansive and you’ll be hiking around the hills of Yasgur’s farm for hours. By the way, the museum costs $13! (But worth every penny, I’m sure.)

It must have taken quite some time to graffiti this Bug! Photo by Kate Langenburg.

It must have taken quite some time to graffiti this Bug! Photo by Kate Langenburg.

The Harvest Festival was very much like a large farmer’s and artisan market. There were displays of handcrafted quilts made by local seamstresses, an auction for some pretty neatly painted tables, and many interesting things to look at. My favorite was a painted VW Bug sitting in the middle of the field.

The tables of farmers was far more than I expected. Here’s a brief list of what was being sold that day: lettuce, cheeses, wine, peppers, apples, pumpkin, apple cider, soups, breads, squash, gourds, candies, sauces, and flowers. There were even some cool looking sugar cookies in the shapes of peace signs. How appropriate.

The farmer’s market portion of the Harvest Festival actually happens every Sunday. Here is a complete list of vendors.

Not only did the Festival have good food. It also had activities, too. There was a fun little corn maze to get lost in, which I definitely had to do. The corn was so tall I felt like I was in the jungle. There were also musician workshops and mini jam sessions for those interested.

Pumpkins, gourds, and veggies, oh my! Photo by Kate Langenburg.

Pumpkins, gourds, and veggies, oh my! Photo by Kate Langenburg.

The shuttle bus ran from the Harvest Festival area up to the museum. The ride along the way was great! Our groovy bus driver pointed out famous Woodstock spots, like the skinny dipping pond and the area where the original stage once was.

Thank goodness for those tents — the bluegrass bands that played needed the cover to perform. They managed to grab the attention of many festival-goers, and some even sat out in the rain to watch them play. Unfortunately, the audience seating was not under a tent, so some people were deterred from the music.

To wrap this up, I highly recommed checkout out the Farmer’s Market next Sunday. You’ll be so glad you did because of all the wonderful fruits and vegetables you’ll come home with. Also, do the museum, too. Any Woodstock fan would be highly stoked, maaaan.

 

 

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