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Posts Tagged ‘artists’

Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Upon stumbling around the internet the other day, I came across a news story on a Chinese painter with some absolutely wonderful and fun art. His name is Liu Bolin, he is thirty five years old, and every picture he paints is a self portrait. How’s it done? He simply paints himself invisible….into each photograph, of course. 

Completion of one painting may take up to ten hours. Many of his pieces are not done on canvas, but instead he paints on himself. He then strategically places himself around certain parts of his city and has a photographer shoot photos of him. People that pass by his artwork usually don’t even realize he is in the scenery until he moves an arm or a leg.

According to Oddity Central, Bolin’s art is a form of protest to the Chinese government, which has caused him to feel a loss of personal identiy and also shut down his art studio back in 2005. One of his main goals, it seems, is to be strange — he doesn’t want to fit into modern society. Who can blame him? (PS. By clicking on the oddity central link, you can view a few more of his paintings.)

Watch the video of his work from ABC News….

or do a google image search for more of his art.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

A smallish chalk, ink, and pen drawing has been quite the topic of conversation in the art world lately. Back in January, the painting was sold at an art auction at Christie’s in New York. It was titled “a Young Girl in Profile in Renaissance Dress.” It’s value was labeled at anywhere between $12,000 and $16,000.
The newly discovered painting. Photo from dwworld.com.

The newly discovered painting. Photo from dwworld.com.

But then the dealer who purchased the painting, Kate Ganz, suggested that perhaps it was based off of a Leonardo Da Vinci type of design. Since then, the painting’s value has been upped to $160 million.

According to dw world.com, art sleuths then had to determine it’s authenticity. “The painting was photographed using a multi-spectral camera developed by the Lumiere Technology company in Paris.

Then Peter Paul Biro, a Montreal-based forensic art expert, examined the images of the drawing and identified a fingerprint near the top left of the art work which matched that of the index or middle-finger of Leonardo da Vinci. The Lumiere process enables the pigments mixtures and pigments of each pixel to be identified without having to damage the drawing by taking a physical sample.

Professor Kemp originally code-named the painting La Bella Milanese, and then later re-named it to La Bella Principessa after he identified her, by what he called a process of elimination, as Bianca Sforza, the daughter of Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan and his mistress Bernardina de Corradis.

The vellum of the painting was also subjected to a Carbon-14 analysis at the Institute for Particle Physics in Zurich which gave the painting a date in the range of 1452 to 1508.”

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

Ah yes, another festival. Well, summer is the season for great festivals, you know. This time, I want to introduce you to a fest that lasts for over a month, so you’ll have plenty of opportunity to take part in the celebrations. It’s the Philadelphia Live Arts and Philly Fringe Festival.

A break dancer performs at last year's Philadelphia Live Arts Festival & Philly Fringe. Photo by R. Kennedy.

A break dancer performs at last year's Philadelphia Live Arts & Philly Fringe Festival. Photo by R. Kennedy.

This artsy fest was started 12 years ago, with efforts to suport Philly artists and help stimulate people’s interest in the art world. The entire festival is dedicated to the performing arts (that’s theater, dance, poetry, puppetry, visual arts, and music) and will run from September 4-19.

For a list of all shows and performers, please visit the Shows website. There are so many that I could not list them all here.

Not only are there performances throughout the month, but there are also workshops for aspiring artists to take part in. This aspect of the festival really livens the whole scene because it makes audiences become involved in the action.

An interesting feature of their website for 2009’s festival is the “fun stuff” category, in which you can see videos from some of past year’s performances. Check out their YouTube.

If you’re into the arts and live near Philadelphia, the fest organizers are also looking for volunteers to help out with the shindig. Find out more information on the volunteer portion of the website.

I think this is a great idea, especially for a city so full of art like Philly is. The artists there no no boundaries, which can certainly make for an exciting, interesting experience. Definitely go check out this entertainment. It lasts so long, you can easily squeeze it into your schedule.

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Kate Langenburg/A&E Groove

I would like to pause for a brief second today to mention Dale Chihuly, a glass blowing artist who has won tons of awards for his projects.

It seems as of late that I have been noticing his art more often. I have seen it in world famous casinos, in photos on the news, and even in the strangest of places — a desert botanical garden.

Although Chihuly’s work takes on very much of the same type of shape and form, all of it is unique in its own way. Take, for example, this statue I came across in Arizona:

Chihuly's main sculpture in the Desert Botanical Garden. Photo by Kate Langenburg.

Chihuly's main sculpture in the Desert Botanical Garden. Photo by Kate Langenburg.

Each individual piece must have taken quite some time to create. The sculpture stands about eight feet tall. But here’s my question — how does Chihuly get everything to stay together as one sculpture? Does he use some sort of strong adhesive or is all the glass blown like that from the beginning?

Either way, the colors in this statue are amazing. The yellows and oranges make for a fun, happy feeling. And the fact that it is placed right in the front of Phoenix, Arizona’s Desert Botanical Garden makes it really stand out. (The desert could use a little color anyway!)

Dale Chihuly doesn’t just stick to glass blowing, however. He also indulges in drawings, installations, and videos. Some of the most interesting videos on his website are of him creating his works. You can view them all here.

All in all, I’m thinking that we will be seeing more of this artist in the future. Already his work has gained international status. He has had work displayed in many countries, including Italy and Russia.

Also, people have been going gaga over his stuff. At a recent exhibition of his work, I took a stroll over to the “for sale” items. Looking at the price tags on some of the smallest sculptures was worthy of injury. But for the monetarily endowed art lovers out there, I suppose it’s a small price to pay for good art.

I will leave you of a closeup of a similar Chihuly scuplture that was put on display at the Mohegan Sun in Connecticut last year. The details in each piece of glass are incredible. But, hey…see for yourself.

This is what one of Chihuly's sculptures looks like up close. Photo by Kate Langenburg.

This is what one of Chihuly's sculptures looks like up close. Photo by Kate Langenburg.

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